How I take notes (cram) for JLPT N3

So it’s only a few days before the big test, everyone! I made a video yesterday about how I take notes and pretty much cram for the test. I’m not focusing on listening as in all my practice tests, listening is the best aspect, but I really do need to work on vocabulary and Kanji. As I’ve mentioned many times before, just making lists of words won’t help, but learning the vocabulary word or Kanji in context of its meaning is very useful.

For that reason, I’ve made a color coding system for my notebook and it helps me easily distinguish between the words, their meanings, and example sentences.

Notebooks
1. Kakao Friends Neo Garden ring bound notebook (vocabulary)
2. Thin Muji A5 brown notebook (from a pack of 5 with different colored spines)

DSCN6270.JPG
The Nihongo 500-mon book, and my Kakao Friends notebook for vocab

Stationery & Color coding system
Black pens (Muji 0.35, 0.5 and Daiso pens) = Kanji and kana
Blue pens (Muji 0.35 and 0.5) = Word meanings
Pink pen (Muji Sarasara click pen) = Example sentences
Yellow marker = Highlighting words I still need to memorize after reviewing once

Screenshot 2018-11-29 at 09.44.57

Process
1. Do the example test in the ๆ—ฅๆœฌ่ชž500ๅ• book
2. Turn the page and see if I did it right
3. Check if there are any new words, especially if I got the question wrong
4. Highlight or underline the word in the book
5. If there are grammar explanations, write the grammar in a separate notebook
6. If there are new vocab words, write them using the system above into a larger vocabulary notebook
7. Review regularly and highlight using yellow if I still need to get the word in my long-term memory

Other notes
I mark the pages in my test practice book with sticky notes. One note is for where I need to summarize from (meaning put new words or grammar explanations into my notebooks), and the other note means I still need to highlight words to be put into the book later.

Screenshot 2018-11-29 at 09.46.35

That’s about it for now, because I should probably get back to studying.
Good luck to all of you taking the exam this Sunday! ๐Ÿ™‚

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What is a TCK?

TCK is short for Third Culture Kid. TCKs are people who grew up outside of the country or culture of their nationality. I grew up in Paris, Islamabad, Pretoria, Dubai and Japan, and moving around this much has had both positive and negative impacts on my life.

There’s a big online community for Third Culture Kids! I was recently interviewed by Mathilde from The Third Culture Kid Project. There are some questions that are difficult for TCKs to answer, like “where is home?” and “can you settle in one country?”

Here’s an except from my interview with her:

Do you picture yourself settling in a specific country? Why?

Thatโ€™s a really tough question. Settling is hard for a TCK! I feel like many TCKs have commitment issues when it comes to choosing to live in one country. I enjoyed growing up having to move countries every few years, and itโ€™s in my blood to want to move around a lot. If I get married and have children though, Iโ€™m not sure Iโ€™d want to subject my children to the stress of uprooting every few years, unless it was part of my job or my husbandโ€™s job. If thatโ€™s not the case, I would probably settle somewhere until my kids are out of the house. Then time to move around again!

Photo by Mathilde from The Third Culture Project

In this video, I try to come to terms with mixed emotions surrounding my multicultural upbringing. This is the first time I cry on camera, which was a bit embarrassing, but I wanted to share my true feelings with you guys – also in the hope of meeting fellow TCKs.